Monday, December 14, 2009

THE BAADER MEINHOF COMPLEX


Germany in the 1970s: Murderous bomb attacks, the threat of terrorism and the fear of the enemy inside are rocking the very foundations of the yet fragile German democracy. The radicalised children of the Nazi generation lead by Andreas Baader, Ulrike Meinhof and Gudrun Ensslin are fighting a violent war against what they perceive as the new face of fascism: American imperialism supported by the German establishment, many of whom have a Nazi past. Their aim is to create a more human society but by employing inhuman means they not only spread terror and bloodshed, they also lose their own humanity. The man who understands them is also their hunter: the head of the German police force Horst Herold. And while he succeeds in his relentless pursuit of the young terrorists, he knows he’s only dealing with the tip of the iceberg.


Before I graduated New England Institute of Technology, I took sociology as an elective and I studied The Baader Meinhof Gang of Germany trying to understand why this group labeled a terrorist organization had taken roots in the late 1960s throughout much of the 1970s. I give the Germans a lot of credit, they are intense and unapologetic to their filmaking and interpretation of this pivotal time in history.

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